Intern - Decca Publishing

Synch & Licensing London, United Kingdom Req. UMG-784


Description

 

Job title: Intern

Responsible to: Head of Decca Publishing

Department: Decca Publishing

Location of work: Kensington Village

 

 

Main Purpose of Role

Supporting sync Team on a day to day basis, key duties will include:

 

  • Logging all creative pitches/ confirmed projects so they’re traceable at all times.
  • Clearance of UK repertoire on international low level projects.
  • Clearance/Licensing of all UK student and charity synch requests.
  • Assisting on Marketing Materials for both Decca Records and Decca Publishing including, promotion of new tracks, Mailouts, Gig ticket request and stock ordering.
  • Collating and distributing assets – e.g. pack shots, press releases, biogs etc.
  • Arranging travel and getting travel reqs approved by finance.
  • General department business administration, as required.

 

Person Specification

  • A desire to work in Synch/Marketing.
  • Strong administrator, with excellent and proven organisation skills.
  • Hardworking, organised and self-motivated individual.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • Able to write copy efficiently.
  • Creative thinker.
  • Strong IT skills including excellent PowerPoint and bespoke systems.
  • An interest in Contemporary Classical and Core classical Music.
  • Excellent attention to detail.
  • Highly digitally savvy.

 

Diversity and Inclusion

Universal Music is an equal opportunities employer. We embrace diversity and are committed to a working environment where no one will be treated less favourably on grounds of their sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, belief or age.

 

Disclaimer

The company presents this job description as a guide to the major areas and duties for which the jobholder is accountable.  However, the business operates in an environment that demands change and the jobholder's specific responsibilities and activities will vary and develop.  Therefore, the job description should be seen as indicative and not as a permanent, definitive and exhaustive statement.